Facts in Context of Truth

The Christian worldview is the best home for facts. The idea that one can have “just the facts” with no framework to judge them except “objective” human common sense is the worldview of naturalism. It is not Christian. We must get away from the idea that there is a neutral worldview. Truth runs deeper than mere facts. It involves interpreting the data within the framework of what is good and true. It is not imposing a cultural idea on the facts, it is receiving true truth from God’s written revelation.

As Christians we infuse God’s meaning on the conception of a child, calling the child a baby. Scientific investigation cannot provide that designation without operating through a Christian worldview Continue reading “Facts in Context of Truth”

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The Relationship of Truth and Love

truth-in-loveTruth and love have a symbiotic relationship. You cannot have one without the other less we confuse truth with facts. You can have true facts without love – in the church this looks like religion. Truth is a Person. Jesus lived is a fact of history. Jesus lives is a truth of eternity. His life is the great message of love. Jesus is the expression to the world that God is love. For God so loved the world that He gave His only Son, Jesus . . .

Truth, by its very nature, is exclusive of all that is false. Jesus being the way, the truth, and the life, means that all other like claims are false. Jesus doesn’t give life, He is life. He gives Himself. Jesus doesn’t show us the way, He is the way. Jesus is not just a truth teller, He is Truth. Jesus excludes that which is not Jesus from being the truth. Buddha, Vishnu, Mohammed, Zeus, and the Flying Spaghetti Monster are all excluded.

Love, by its very nature, is inclusive – For God so loved the world.  . .  Continue reading “The Relationship of Truth and Love”

Truth and Facts: What’s the Truth?

Uchitel-1The first day of my Advanced English class, my professor announced to the class that we needed to get one thing straight before we commenced the semester. She then declared unequivocally that there is no absolute truth. She asked if that was settled or if anyone objected. My hand shot up. My heart was pounding as she and the class turned their attention on me.

“Ok then give me a fact, any fact,” she challenged.

“The earth is round,” came my response.

“Have you measured it?” She taunted.

I stared at her confused as to her retort.

“Give me another fact,” she persisted. Continue reading “Truth and Facts: What’s the Truth?”

How to Judge an Article

With the advent of on-line social media, articles compete for our click. The desire for ad revenue garnered by the views, hits, and clicks upon the article and its corresponding advertisements dictates the content. Much of what passes as journalism is simply an enticement for your click rather than your mind. Headlines scream for your attention. Questions beg your consideration, but only long enough to acquire the requisite click.Feel free to use this image just link to www.rentvine.com

Upon clicking you may find a list, a series of pictures, a short video, or what barely passes for a short article. These get liked, tagged, shared, and tweeted ad nauseam. Seldom do the articles get judged, much less researched. In an effort to promote journalistic integrity, I’ve provided a list of ways to judge an article before liking, sharing, or tweeting. For the purposes of this article, I am limiting the subject to news articles rather than those deemed entertainment.

  1. Read the entire article. If its contents are valuable enough to like or share, they were first worth reading.
  1. Don’t get fooled by headlines. Did the article live up to its headline? Many times the headlines are dishonest eye catching advertisements. If we are not careful, we will believe the headline regardless of the contents of the article and share it on the merit of the headline alone. If the headline reads Science Proves Cats Love Swimming and the article is of a story of one cat owned by one scientist who likes to swim in the pool it did not pass this test. Most articles can be disregarded by this one test.
  1. Did the article prove its thesis? A thesis is the main point the article is designed to convey. Is the author telling you what to believe about a social issue, or is the author providing plenty of supporting details so that you have all the information necessary to decide if his opinion is merited? Just because you already agree with the premise does not mean that the writer provided sufficient supporting evidence.

Continue reading “How to Judge an Article”

My Writing Process

Writing-writing-29931875-1366-768Literally anything can be the spark that ignites into a composition. However, it is seldom one spark, but a whole train of thoughts and experiences that coalesce into an idea. The idea bounces around in my thoughts for a while. It grows as I consider the concept. It accompanies me as I read, think, and interact with others. I am always looking at what forms our way of looking at the world. Where do the ideas originate. How do I get at the core of what motivates our thinking. How do I highlight healthy thinking and expose the entrapment of errant thinking.

At some point in this process, the idea begins to formulate into something I can mold into words. It strengthens within. Often the sentences begin to form in my mind. One sentence will lead to the next on an invisible sheet of paper. I write in my head before I make it visible. Once the writing begins inside, it is begging to be made manifest. Then I write.

I begin with what I wrote on that invisible mental page, and then, from there, flows the rest. I pull on all the thoughts, experiences, and research calling it forth like a Continue reading “My Writing Process”

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