Denouncing Deconstruction

Deconstruction is not a Christian practice. Truth comes from divine revelation. It is received, it is not constructed. Theology is not the practice of constructing truth, it is the practice of applying true revelation to every area of life.

Some applied theology has taken centuries for a culture to change the way it thinks to accurately apply the truth. We have seen this in how Christian societies have shifted from people who persecute heretics to a people who enumerate civil law to protect freedom of religion. Read more

Thoughts on Books I Read in 2018

Every year I set out to read 52 books, the equivalent of one a week for a year. I have never reached my goal, but I aim for it every year. This year I read 37 books. These included history, theology, poetry, and fiction. Here are a few highlights from my 2018 reading. Read more

Book Review of Books Read in 2017

Every year I set out to read 52 books. I usually make it to between 32-38 books in a year. This year I read only 24 which is an exceptionally slow reading year for me. Unexpected turns came in 2016 and 2017 that slowed my pace in both writing and reading. I hope to get my groove back in 2018. I am off to a good start having finished reading my first book of the year on January 2.

Below are some of the highlights of my 2017 reading: Read more

On Writing

writing-ppcI am passionate about writing. I’ve loved writing from a young age. I still have my handwritten attempts at writing a Nancy Drew novel as well as my attempt at a Star Trek novel. However, today I write non-fiction along with an occasional poem. I’m the girl who loved essay assignments in college. I signed up for every writing intensive course I could find. I was often disappointed that the classes were not challenging enough. I wanted to be pushed to grow in skill and technique. Read more

Saving Western Civilization

historyA decade has passed since I sat in my Introduction to History class listening to my professor lament on our inability to know history. Instead of introducing her students to the fascinating world of historical knowledge, she adeptly laid the foundation of its futility. Her philosophy ought to have caused her resignation as her own field of discipline had no purpose pursuant her own admission. In fact, her philosophy undermined the entire historical department at the University not to mention the discipline itself. The professor did not simply suggest this untoward line of thinking, she professed it as truth, at least in as much as it could be in a world without truth. She opined truth’s nonexistence in the same manner she dispensed with the ability to know history.

A few weeks into the course, I would hear the same professor attempt to validate her point of view that plagiarism is a moral wrong while many of the students argued that there were legitimate allowances for it. She had no ground to stand on since she had already dismissed the existence of truth weeks before. All she had at her disposal was indignation at the moral malaise of her students. It is not every day that a person comes face to face with the logical conclusions of one’s own philosophy.

Most people live in conflict with their own philosophy. Read more

It’s a Wonderful World

What if you could look at an object and have its history mapped out before your eyes? You consider a book and a timeline unfolds tracing all the ideas back to their origin. You whistory-homealk through the door of an institution and its history fills-in, in complete detail, as you traverse the hallways.

There are people who have such knowledge. They hear an idea and can tell you of the philosophers who first introduced it according to known history. Others read a style of writing and can identify the writers who influenced this author. Some can hear a musical composition and can tell you the history of the style and what songs influenced the composers. But for most of us, learning the origins of ideas, institutions, culture, and worldviews requires Read more

For the Love of Books

Some people rescue cats and dogs, I rescue books. I’m a book rescuer. I’ve treasure hunted for special finds in Thrift Stores for many years. Over the years, I have observed the mistreatment of books in these establishments. They are tossed in large bins or baskets before being placed on the display shelves. They sit huddled, one atop of another, this way and that, with pages bending and bindings straining. I’ve watched thrift store clerks rearrange the books on a shelf by slamming them into a grocery cart before they reload them on a different shelf. I’ve also seen what happens at the end of the line when the unsold books go to the clearance warehouse and then the trash. Oh the misery of watching books cast away as worthless paper.

booksI have always enjoyed finding books for my own collection at thrift store prices. Some years ago, I began buying books I already own that I deem excellent reads. I rescue these poor books from their thrift store prisons and save them for readers who want them. When I am discussing a particular book or author with a friend and they express interest in the book, I search my give away collection to find the book its new home.

I fulfill several purposes in this arrangement. First, I enjoy the treasure hunt. Second, I enjoy saving readers the retail price by Read more